A Bobwhite quail ducks in-and-out of cover

While Colby and Jacob again swapped equipment, I acquainted myself with one of the leaders of the next stage of our hunt, an 11-month-old “Rockstar” (Colby’s descriptor) named Louise. Indeed, watching Louise (Brittany) and Venus (German Wirehaired Pointer) working together was another sight-to-behold. Truthfully, Louise used some of her excessive, adolescent energy to rocket around. However, she came when summoned, and backed up Venus (a.k.a ‘V’) when the latter was locked on a bird.

Before the final stage of the hunt, the author gets acquainted with ‘The Rockstar’, 11-month-old, Louise

Though this last session was a bit shorter, there were still plenty of opportunities to watch their magic. On the last bird, V again was the first on-scene, with the Rockstar blocking the escape route. There was absolutely no movement from either the Brittany or Pointer as our group of four moved onto the dogs’ stage. The bird launched from between the two dogs’ noses. It was another beautiful chukar, and this time the shot caught up with the bird as he tried to zig into the treeline to our right. Like all her compatriots with whom we hunted, Venus dashed to the downed bird and then, head held high, trotted proudly back to deliver the bird to her master. We called it a day. There were birds and a shotgun to be cleaned, but, most of all, there were six lovely dogs to spend time thanking for providing such a wonderful day in the field. It may sound like hyperbole, but it is clear, even to this novice, that their handlers have trained up a set of artists who are masters of their craft. If these wonderful canines from South Fork are ever again willing, I will happily trail behind them through the rolling fields, bottomlands and open hardwood stands of the Georgia Piedmont.

Venus, a.k.a. ‘V’, returns with the author’s final bird, another beautiful chukar

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