Use Enough Bullet: .35 Whelen Improved and Swift A-Frame Bullets for Cape Buffalo

This ‘hunting’ story or more accurately, ‘preparation for hunting’ story, was very enjoyable to write. It allowed me to dream of using my late-Dad’s custom built rifle to take a Cape Buffalo. It is yet to be seen whether that dream will become a reality, but I’m going to give it a go this November. Hope you enjoy this article as much as I did putting it together. You can check it out here.
13b) Rifle, bullets and cartridges - cropped
 
 

Quotes of Note – How Times Have Changed

During the latter decades of the 19th Century, Frenchman Édouard Foa traveled, and hunted extensively, from one end of Africa to another. The diversity of species taken, the extensiveness of his geographical and natural history observations, as well as his description of equipment carried, provides a wonderful journal in his After Big Game in Central Africa. For me, one of the most delightful aspects of Foa’s text was its historical setting. The following quote concerning his views on the newfangled piece of equipment he called a ‘telescope’, but we know as the ‘riflescope’.

“A telescope adjusted on the barrel [of his .303 rifle] is intended to magnify and consequently bring the quarry nearer; but I was never able to use this instrument, and I recommend you, if one is suggested to you, not to make this useless expenditure.”

On the off chance that the reader had not understood his point Foa added:

“As to diamond sights, telescopic sights, or others…which imaginative gunsmiths invent at every moment, the only object which they reach is, most certainly, the pocket of the sportsman.”

.700 Nitro Express? Yes, Please!!

Thank you Jérôme Lanoue of L’Atelier Verney-Carron for providing me the opportunity to fire his personal rifle chambered in .700 Nitro Express

Load - Cropped

Jérôme told me to aim between the target’s ‘bulls’ as if it was the boss of a charging Cape Buffalo.

Ready

The moment of truth…

Fire

I pulled the shot a bit to the right (if you squint, you can see the hole near the left corner of the right bull)…

Hole in Buffalo Appears

And, there’s the HUGE hole made by the passage of the 1000-grain soft-point!

Hole a bit right! - cropped.jpg

I will need more practice, but I am still smiling after being given the chance to shoot this magnificent rifle!

Still Smiling! - cropped

 

MG Arms Ultra-Light Rifle in .416 Taylor

“You begin carrying a pack, canteen, food, full-weight rifle and a handgun strapped to your waist. After 14 days you don’t even want to carry the handgun.” – Kerry O’Day

This review was born out of a series of conversations with MG Arms Owners, Carol and Kerry O’Day. Our interactions occurred during the Dallas Safari Club’s 2019 Convention.

Knowing a bit about the esteem with which they and their products were held, and the number of writers who were at the time pestering them for access to their products, I was a bit surprised by their willingness to send out a rifle to yours truly. The decision was made to have me work with the model that established MG Arms as a major, custom-firearms manufacturer, the Ultra-Light rifle

See the full review of this fantastic rifle here.

1) MGA Ultra-Light

Dreams of Small Boys

Growing up reading the wonderful books on hunting in Africa, I dreamed of shooting an ‘elephant rifle’. Thanks to the wonderful folks at Verney-Carron, Blaser USA and MG Arms, I can now put a check next to that line on my bucket list. In the top photograph, the left-hand cartridge is a .458 Lott with a Hornady 500 grain solid used in my review of an R8 Platform Blaser rifle. On the right is a .416 Taylor cartridge topped with a 400 grain A-Frame used in my recent review of an MG Arms Ultra-Light. In the bottom photograph, the Verney-Carron Azur side-by-side in .450/400 3″ Nitro Express and two of its cartridges are pictured. All three of these calibers have accounted for the largest, toughest and most dangerous game, including elephant. As Robert Ruark reflected: “…dreams are not taxed for small boys, not even the wildest ones.” (Horn of the Hunter)

458 and .416 Cartridges

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